Priorities

I have dozens of open source software projects, in various stages of development.  I have three wood working projects waiting in the shed to be finished. I have phasmid populations studies I haven’t written up yet.  I have  four book reconstructions that I haven’t finished.

If you had 6 days to live, what would you work on? If you had  six months? Thirty years?

For me, my mind never stops.  It’s always coming up with ideas.  There is always software to write, there are always things to make with wood (and power tool therapy).  So, faced with a body that is failing, and a mind that isn’t, what would you work on?

The answer is: work on something you want to work on, you will anyway.  Work on something personally rewarding, or personally useful.  It turns out, the time limit is almost entirely irrelevant.

I’m working on a major release of Aegis, but also pecking away at other software projects, as brain capacity and haemoglobin permit.

I work on bug fixes and feature requests for my OSS projects if I feel like it; but that’s how OSS works.  Send me a patch, on the other hand, and I’ll integrate it the same days as I get it.

“Start a new project!” — Robert Collins.

Oops, yes, I did this, too.

Treatment

On the 11-Dec-2012 we start a third  chemotherapy sequence, this time using Bendamustine and Mabthera.  The list of known side effects of Bendamustine is very long.  What it will do to me is unknown, except that I will be allergic, and we will treat the symptoms and keep right on using the drug, because it’s my best bet, right now.  The treatment regimen has 2 days on and 26 days off, times 4 cycles.  In what looks like an emerging pattern, the Bendamustine isn’t on the PBS, so once again I am paying for a chemotherapy drug out of my own pocket.

We decided to start the chemotherapy now, rather than wait until after christmas.  My preference is to be doing, rather than waiting, even when doing will be confronting.  To procrastinate, to do nothing, is to choose to die.  I choose the option with at least a chance of living.

I accept this gift.